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Updates from ASLA

ASLA 2020 Residential Design Award of Excellence. Marshcourt, Cambridge, MA. Reed Hilderbrand >

ASLA Defends Licensure and Active Transportation

For the first time since 2009, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DoT) has proposed revisions to the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control devices (MUTCD). The MUTCD is a compilation of national standards for all traffic control devices, including road markings, highway signs, and traffic signals. The MUTCD defines the standards used by road managers nationwide to install and maintain traffic control devices on all public streets, highways, bikeways, and private roads open to public travel. The MUTCD is published by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) under 23 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 655, Subpart F.

ASLA, along with numerous other organizations nationwide, have many concerns with the proposed revision. Chief among ASLA’s concerns is a provision to exclude landscape architects from interpreting or applying the provisions in the manual, which conflicts with state licensure laws. Landscape architects are competent to use, interpret, and apply the MUTCD, and frequently do so to prepare and implement project designs while protecting the health, safety, and welfare of the public. Therefore, ASLA in conjunction with CLARB, submitted formal comments requesting the harmful language be removed or revised to allow the manual to be interpreted and applied by a qualified licensed professional, and not only engineers.

In addition to the ASLA/CLARB letter, ASLA submitted a petition to U.S. DoT with 1,060 signatures supporting the request to remove the harmful language limiting the scope of landscape architecture practice and expressing concern over the proposed documents lack of needed flexibility to plan and design urban, suburban, and rural streets that put the safe mobility of people first, rather than the movement of vehicles.

Please join ASLA’s iAdvocate Grassroots Network and use your voice to help advance policies important to the profession.

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