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ASLA 2021 Professional Residential Design Honor Award. Ghost Wash. Paradise Valley, AZ. COLWELL SHELOR LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE >

Milestones & New Members

60 YEARS+
California Southern Chapter

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Robert M. Eriksson, FASLA

Where are you from and how long have you been a landscape architect? Born in Iowa, I grew up in Pasadena, California. After serving in the Air National Guard at the tail end of World War II, I came back to Southern California where I remain to this day. In 1962 I co-founded (with past national ASLA President Owen Peters) the firm now known as EPTDESIGN. I have been a member of ASLA for 67 years! How did you begin your career journey in Landscape architecture? The path began at a young age. Gardening jobs in my neighborhood, botany classes in high school, a weekend job at a nursery, and summers working as a carpenter all helped me to see Landscape Architecture as a logical career goal. Around 1950, the University of Southern California opened a department of Landscape Architecture within the school of Architecture and I was in the first graduating class. Garrett Eckbo, with his contemporary landscape design philosophy, was my mentor throughout the four years - an exciting introduction into midcentury design! Following graduation I worked for Garrett in his private practice studio for several years before starting my own private practice. What do you think is the most important issue facing landscape architecture? I’m concerned with the many tracks that the profession is taking. My career has been focused on bringing beauty and a collaborative approach to my clients and everyone who would experience my work. With so much effort being spent on solving environmental issues and social issues, I worry that the basics of good design and beauty are rarely discussed. It was a benchmark of the profession in its early years and seems to be absent these days. What have you gained by being a member of ASLA for 67 years? I will say that the early years were fun and very important to me. My partners and I were heavily involved in ASLA both at the local and national level. The organization was far smaller in those early days and we felt a deep sense of camaraderie and community within the organization. What would you share with those new to the profession of landscape architecture? I’d encourage new members to find a great firm where you can be mentored well and grow. To make time to get out and travel – the world is a great big, messy, wonderful place and there is much to be learned by experiencing places beyond your borders. I’d also say that it takes at least five solid years of practice before you’ll begin to find your legs…and, to be honest, at 97 year of age, I’m still learning. This profession is a wonderful place for lifelong learning!


40 Years +
North Carolina ASLA Chapter

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Leslee A. Temple, FASLA

Where are you from and how long have you been a landscape architect? I was born & raised in Long Beach, CA. Received my BSLA, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona in 1973. How did you begin your career journey in Landscape architecture? I had been a Girl Scout since Brownies and went to GS camp, came home & said I wanted to be a park ranger & design campgrounds. When in High School, to continue that goal, was denied taking a drafting class because it was for boys only in the 60's. Then at the last minute, I was given the opportunity - way later in life, when I was a partner in a landscape architecture firm. My father told me he had gone to the school board to 'petition' for me to be in the drafting class. What do you think is the most important issue facing landscape architects today? Creating & convincing the 'public' of the value of our profession in sooooo many ways. What have you gained by being a member of ASLA for 46 years? Value & strength of togetherness. Although women in the 60s were not were not 'accepted' in ASLA. At my fathers (who was a civil engineer) encouragement, during my senior in college went to an ASLA meeting & was told at the front door 'women are not accepted here' that's when I joined American Institute of Landscape Architects & was later part of the 'team' that merged the 2 organizations. What would you share with others as a reason for belonging to ASLA as a member? Education, comradery, strength in numbers to take our 'value' to government issues. What would you share with those new to the profession of landscape architecture? They're very blessed that 'glass' ceilings have been lifted & all races & ages have a value in landscape architecture.

 

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Frederick E. Halback, FASLA

Where are you from and how long have you been a landscape architect? Having grown up in Central Florida, I co-founded Herbert Halback, Inc. in 1978 in Orlando, two years after graduating from the University of Florida.  In 2000, I moved to St. Augustine, Fl, started teaching at the University of Florida, and opened a new office which has become Marquis Latimer + Halback, Inc.   I currently live in Highlands, NC. How did you begin your career journey in Landscape architecture? I’ve always felt that landscape architecture is a ‘found profession’. In high school I took two years of drafting and assumed, as I started junior college, that I wanted to be an architect. When it came time to declare a major at the University of Florida, I read with interest the curriculum for landscape architecture. I had never heard of it, but it appealed to my love of the outdoors and my reverence of nature. I have never looked back on my decision. What do you think is the most important issue facing landscape architects today? Sustainability and resiliency as we approach the inevitable consequences of climate change. What’s our place in finding a solution? What have you gained by being a member of ASLA for 45 years? The feeling of accomplishment. Of being part of a profession that makes a difference. I was honored to be elected to the College of Fellows for Built Works in 1997.What would you share with others as a reason for belonging to ASLA as a member? Landscape Architecture is a very small profession. It is vital that we are all advocates and preachers for the importance of landscape architecture in the realm of the planning and design of our built environment. What would you share with those new to the profession of landscape architecture? Landscape architects should lead, not follow. We are well suited to be the prime consultants of most projects if we just step up and assume the role. What is your favorite project in your career and why? I’ve always felt that we are only as good as the last project constructed. So, I guess that makes the Daytona Beach Riverfront Esplanade my favorite project. It is nearly completed and encompasses one mile of riverfront in downtown Daytona Beach at a cost of $31 million. It is designed to be resilient and has withstood two recent hurricane events. Of course, our firm is leading the design team. What in your view is the most important thing that landscape architects provide? At our best, to have a holistic view of how the built environment can successfully fit within nature. Is there anything else you would like to share to commemorate your 45 years with ASLA? Thank you to our firm’s principals and fellow employees.  It’s good to still be standing and hopefully relevant.


30 Years +
Florida ASLA Chapter

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Aida Curtis, ASLA

Where are you from and how long have you been a landscape architect? I am from Honduras – one of the poorest countries in this hemisphere. I have been a landscape architect for almost 40 years. How did you begin your career journey in Landscape architecture? I came to this country in 1980, after graduating from High school in Honduras, I went to Texas A&M to study architecture. Since I didn’t know anything about landscape architecture, given that the first year of study is common for all design disciplines at A&M – I started learning more about Landscape Architecture and that was more my passion. I loved that there was a career so fitting to my likes. What do you think is the most important issue facing landscape architects today? Being involved in adaptation to Climate Change. Many landscape architects are not in tune to the many opportunities we have, and how well suited we are to be leading the teams doing Climate Adaptation. The focus these days is on nature-based solutions. We are trained in all aspects designing with nature. I believe we not only NEED to be at the table, but we need to be LEADING the discussions. The public still sees us as being able to solely do planting plans. We need to be educating them on all our abilities and advocating for our leadership in this topic. What have you gained by being a member of ASLA for 30 years? To be truthful it has only been the last two years that I have been very involved in ASLA. In the past I saw it as a “cliquey” group- favoring white males in the larger cities doing only the larger projects. ASLA has changed and it has become more inclusive. Having been involved in the past two years, I love participating on committees, exchanging ideas with other professionals, sharing stories and advocating for all. I learn from others – what others are doing – how we can make the profession more visible. What would you share with others as a reason for belonging to ASLA as a member? The ability to share resources, learn from others. What would you share with those new to the profession of landscape architecture? Get involved in your community. Find out what climate issues your community is facing – offer your expertise. What is your favorite project in your career and why? Would you like to submit/share a picture of it? The FBI Miramar office building (Benjamin P Grogan and Gerry L Dove Federal Building) working with an amazing team led by Krueck and Sexton Architects in Chicago for an amazing client – GSA ( Obama Administration) which had set high sustainability expectations for the project. We as Landscape Architects had a significant role in the Design Criteria – our idea of recreating wetlands and siting the building in the middle as a demonstration of what working with nature, was the concept that was executed. While we did not do the construction drawings our ideas were executed. Beautiful project. What in your view is the most important thing that landscape architects provide? A wholistic approach to a project. Looking a historic precedent, site history, social, ecological, and sustainable issues. Is there anything else you would like to share to commemorate your 30 years with ASLA? I am applying for fellowship this year, and feel very positive about it.


25 YEARS
Arizona Chapter

Edward Corral, ASLA 

Boston Chapter
Alan D. Rice, ASLA 

Florida Chapter
Katy W. Harrell, ASLA 

Iowa Chapter
Stephen J. Krug, ASLA 

Ohio Chapter
Jodi B. McCue, ASLA

Utah Chapter
Don Leslie, ASLA 

Wisconsin Chapter
Debora M. Sielski, ASLA 

15 YEARS
Boston Chapter

W. Gregory Bilowz, ASLA 

California Southern Chapter
Jennifer Chow Shen, ASLA 

Illinois Chapter
Jeff Eichenauer, ASLA
Ryan Scherner, ASLA

Minnesota Chapter
Benjamin Hartberg, ASLA 

New Jersey Chapter
Randy K. Lesperance, ASLA 

North Carolina Chapter
Nancy Seay, ASLA 

Ohio Chapter
Christian Lynn, ASLA 

10 YEARS
California Northern Chapter

James Swaintek, ASLA 

Idaho/Montana Chapter
Willet C. Howard, ASLA 

Michigan Chapter
Erin Kelly, ASLA 

Minnesota Chapter
Bianca M. Paz, ASLA 

New York Upstate Chapter
Ryan P. Kelly, ASLA 

San Diego Chapter
Joe Dodd, ASLA 

St. Louis Chapter
Erin E. McCown Foster, ASLA 

5 YEARS
Arizona Chapter

Judy Mielke, ASLA 

California Northern Chapter
Kelly Kilpatrick, ASLA 

Connecticut Chapter
Donald Hettrick, ASLA 

Michigan Chapter
Andrew Parin, ASLA 

Minnesota Chapter
Paul D. Liesmaki, ASLA 

New York Chapter
Diane Katz, Affiliate ASLA 

Ohio Chapter
Andrew M. Ciammaichella, ASLA
James A. Schilens, ASLA 

Virginia Chapter
Salim Chishti, ASLA 

Washington Chapter
Catherine De Almeida, ASLA
Diana M. Hammer, ASLA
Craig Ottaveli, Affiliate ASLA
Clara Pang, ASLA
Shraddha V. Sawant, ASLA

Wisconsin Chapter
Dana Schumacher, ASLA 

New Members
California Northern

Megan Bradley, Associate ASLA
Brandon Delon, ASLA
Adriana Esposito, Affiliate ASLA
Nicholas Alan Samuelson, ASLA
Sabrina Swanson Schneckloth, ASLA
Peter Trio, ASLA 

Florida
Jon R. Phillips, ASLA 

Illinois
TIffanie Sperling, Affiliate ASLA 

International Chapter
Hannah Arensen, ASLA 

North Carolina
Teresa Evans-Hunter, Affiliate ASLA
Jeffrey Kuehner, ASLA

Oregon Colleen
Luise Wolfe, ASLA

Pennsylvania/Delaware
Michael Lachman, ASLA 

San Diego
Scott Cohen, Affiliate ASLA
Yoshihito Nagata, ASLA 

Texas
Mariana Chacon Zambrano, Affiliate ASLA
Charles R. Cooper, Associate ASLA
Krishna Fahrlender, Affiliate ASLA
Benjamin Michael Greiner, II, Associate ASLA
Riley Price, ASLA
Kalee Robinson, Affiliate ASLA 

Student
Helen Arnold, Student ASLA
Lee Bryant, Student ASLA
Nicklaus Chapman, Student ASLA
Nicole Dulong, Student ASLA
Edwin Garcia, Student ASLA
Viktoria Grigoryan, Student ASLA
Jennifer Ginn, Student ASLA
Sofia Hernandez, Student ASLA
Misty Johnson, Student ASLA
Basil Khalid, Student ASLA
Molly McLendon, Student ASLA
Jarrod Pace, Student ASLA
Amelia Quinlen, Student ASLA
Josh Schwartz, Student ASLA
Emma Shepard, Student ASLA
Logan Shockey, Student ASLA
Shelby Waddell, Student ASLA
Wei Xia, Student ASLA 

Student Affiliate
Bruce Liu Benson, Student Affiliate ASLA
Sarah Maness, Student Affiliate ASLA
Usman Mehek, Student Affiliate ASLA
Shang Yawei, Student Affiliate ASLA

Student International
Patricio Ignacio Nieto Cahue, Student International ASLA

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