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Updates from ASLA

ASLA 2017 Professional General Design Honor Award. Chicago Botanic Garden: The Regenstein Learning Campus. Mikyoung Kim Design >

Professional Practice News

Each of ASLA's 20 Professional Practice Networks (PPNs) contributes to The Field, a blog that was created to give members who work in landscape architecture a place to exchange information, learn about recent work and research, and share their thoughts about current happenings. In LAND this year, we’ll be rounding up recent posts on The Field you may have missed. If you’d like to receive email notifications as soon as new posts are published, sign up to follow The Field—look for “The Field by Email” box on the right-hand side.

Two new posts are published on The Field each week. Here is what’s been published since the last issue of LAND:

Professional Development Resources for Landscape Architects

“The official start of summer and the mid-year point of 2019 are just about here—if you need PDH, ASLA has you covered!

Is professional license expiring soon? Need professional development hours (PDH) right away? Check out our on-demand education offerings: over 200 Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System™ (LA CES™)-approved online learning presentations and reports, making it easy to meet your continuing education requirements for state licensure.

ASLA Online Learning

Members have access to discounted prices on ASLA Online Learning live and recorded webinars. Throughout the year, ASLA’s Professional Practice Networks host courses on topics from sustainable design to business practices.

If you missed this week’s Pollinator Week webinar, Promoting Pollinators Through Landscape Architecture: Strategies to Improve Habitat Value & Landscape Performance, the recording is now available.

Our next live presentation, co-hosted by the Environmental Justice and Transportation Professional Practice Networks, takes place on Thursday, June 27: Developing an Equity Framework for Government Agencies.

To see discounted prices, log in using your existing ASLA username and password.

High School Architecture Programs Need Landscape Architects

PPN: Education and Practice
by Barbara Peterson, ASLA

“When did you first hear about landscape architecture? Was it before, during, or after college?

When I asked fellow landscape architects that question, their answer was frequently while in college, often in an architecture program, or after they had graduated with a degree in business, finance, horticulture, art, interior design, or, like me, biomedical science. But their common interests included art, nature, the outdoors, working with their hands, and creating things. So, why didn’t someone suggest landscape architecture before they went to college?

Perhaps because most people don’t understand what a landscape architect is or does: landscaper—yes; but landscape architect—no. Participation in workshops, summer programs, and the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) Landscape Architecture Merit Badge help spread the word to youth, but what about high school architectural design programs?

Wait…you didn’t know that some school districts offer architecture as part of their high school curriculum? I had no idea either, until flipping through a course catalog with my son when he entered the ninth grade. He liked architecture and wanted to try the program to be sure.

The four-year program is taught by a registered architect. Students from the district’s five high school campuses are bussed to a central Career Center for a half-day, studio-style class. They learn drafting, hand-lettering, sketching, AutoCAD, Revit, and SketchUp; make cardboard, basswood, and 3D models; and research, design, and learn critical thinking. Projects focus on architecture but each has a landscape design and, sometimes, a planning component.”

Headed for New Heights: Employing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Resiliency Evaluation

PPN: Campus Planning and Design
by Emily Schlickman, ASLA

“Over the past four decades, the United States has experienced 241 distinct climate and weather-related disasters, each incurring over $1 billion dollars in damage. From catastrophic wildfires and landslides in the West, to hail storms and tornados in the Midwest, to unexpected freezes and destructive hurricanes in the Southeast, these events are becoming more common and more expensive. While the overall average since 1980 has been 6.2 billion-dollar events per year, the average for the last five years has doubled, to 12.6.

In response to this trend, landscape architects, urban designers, and urban planners are not only embedding resiliency-focused strategies into their work, they are also assessing the performance of their built work in the face of these events. To do this, they are expanding the traditional designer toolbox to include emerging devices that might help with this assessment. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) represent one type of tool currently being tested for resiliency analysis.”

Paul Dolinsky – Four Decades of Preservations Through Documentation

PPN: Historic Preservation
by Christopher Stevens, ASLA

“On Friday, April 12, 2019, Paul D. Dolinsky, ASLA, retired from an almost 40-year career with the National Park Service (NPS) Heritage Documentation Programs (HDP), where he served as Chief of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) from 1994 to 2005; Chief of the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) from 2005 to 2019; and Acting Chief of HDP from 2018 to 2019.

HDP administers HABS, the Federal Government’s oldest preservation program, and its companion programs: the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) and the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS). Documentation produced through HABS/HAER/HALS constitutes the nation’s largest archive of historic architectural, engineering, and landscape documentation. Records on more than 40,000 historic sites (consisting of large-format black and white photographs, measured drawings, and written historical reports) are maintained in a special collection at the Library of Congress, available to the public copyright free in both hard copy (at the Library of Congress) and via the Library’s website. It is the most heavily used collection at the Library of Congress’ Division of Prints and Photographs.”

Write for The Field!

All ASLA members are invited to submit posts for The Field, and we invite you to join the conversation!

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