Product News by Forms + Surfaces, Longwood Gardens, ANOVA, and Green Roofs for Healthy Cities

Product News by Forms + Surfaces, Longwood Gardens, ANOVA, and Green Roofs for Healthy Cities

4/3/2018

Recently Published on The Field

Each of ASLA's 20 Professional Practice Networks (PPNs) contributes to The Field, a blog that was created to give members who work in landscape architecture a place to exchange information, learn about recent work and research, and share their thoughts about current happenings. In LAND this year, we’ll be rounding up recent posts on The Field you may have missed. If you’d like to receive email notifications as soon as new posts are published, sign up to follow The Field—look for The Field by Email” box on the right-hand side.

Two new posts are published on The Field each week. Here is what’s been published since the last issue of LAND by eight of ASLA’s 20 PPNs:

Promoting Pollinator Habitat as Landscape Architects 
PPN: Ecology & Restoration
by Anthony Fettes, ASLA, PLA, SITES AP

“Around the world, an estimated 80 percent of all flowering plant species and over one-third of our food is dependent upon or benefited by animal pollinators. However, many of these pollinator species are in decline, threatening the productivity of both global food production and ecological communities. What is causing this decline? How are we contributing, and what can be done to reverse this trend?”

Land Use and Transportation Planning Intertwined in Today’s World 
PPN: Landscape—Land Use Planning
by John D. Hendrickson and Elaine Linn, PLA, ASLA

“As landscape architects, we are highly in tune with the principles and practices of land use planning and, for most of us, it is part of our everyday professional life. Although we are often commissioned to design a single site, we know better than anyone the tangible implications to the surrounding areas, the community, and the regional context our designs may impact. So where does site-specific design stop and land use planning in a broader context begin? How do we best steward the resources and demographics in a global and holistic context? To answer these questions we may need to take a look at the connectivity between land uses. And to do that, we are going to tap into the fields of transportation planning and engineering, and analyze how they overlap with our contributions as landscape architects to the modern world of land use planning.”

Smarter Parks, Smarter Cities 
PPN: Parks & Recreation
by Kelsey Jessup

“‘Advancements in technology impact every aspect of our lives—how we work, play, and live,’ says the City of Chicago’s Mayor, Rahm Emanuel. And cities like Chicago are becoming ‘smarter,’ using technology to enhance livability, workability, and sustainability. Yet, some aspects of cities are being left out of planning, most blatantly: public parks. To help address this, the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation recently released SMART Parks: A Toolkit, a compilation of technologies that can be used in parks to increase environmental sustainability, visitor enjoyment, and maintenance efficiency.”

Third Annual Aggie Leadership in Community Development Conference: The Thesen Islands Sustainable Land Redevelopment by CMAI Architects 
PPN: Education & Practice
by Michael Murphy, PhD, ASLA

“In February, the Master of Land and Property Development Program at Texas A&M’s Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, sponsored its third Annual Aggie Leadership in Community Development conference. The conference featured the work of Dr. Chris E. Mulder, Outstanding Alumnus of the College of Architecture and Outstanding International Alumnus of Texas A&M University. The conference, held to improve awareness among the faculty and student body of exemplary work by former students, was held at the Annenberg Conference Center at the George H. W. Bush Presidential Library. Chris Mulder’s firm, CMAI Architects, has been responsible for some of the most significant sustainable development projects in his native South Africa, and for this work he has received international recognition for excellence in development at Thesen Island in Knysna, South Africa.”

Introducing the Campus Resilience Series 
PPN: Campus Planning & Design
by Katharyn Hurd, Associate ASLA

“Many universities have begun discussions around sustainability and creating a more resilient physical campus. Defining resilience is the first, and often most difficult, step. For many campuses, resilience is defined by developing long-term strategies to respond to climate change impacts. It also may include goals to reduce reliance on precious resources and vulnerable infrastructure. Working toward these objectives is essential to the long-term survival of an institution.”

Women in Design: How to Find a Network of Other Women Designers 
PPN: Women in Landscape Architecture
by Christa Schaefer, ASLA, and Tanya Olson, ASLA

“You’ve reached that point in your professional life where you find yourself looking for people to connect professionally and create networks with. These special individuals provide a unique dynamic to the depth of our professional lives and may be peers or mentors. They make us feel self-assured and connected, and sometimes become great friends or even business partners. They can be male or female, but there are benefits to finding connection with others of the same sex. Here are two stories from the Women in Landscape Architecture (WILA) leadership team on how they found a network of Women in Design (WID).”

Icons of Healthcare & Therapeutic Garden Design: Clare Cooper Marcus 
PPN: Healthcare & Therapeutic Design
by Lisa Bailey, ASLA

“Clare Cooper Marcus, Professor Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley, in the College of Environmental Design’s Departments of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, has studied and been the grand champion for healthcare and therapeutic gardens since the time of her retirement from UC Berkeley in the 1990s. She taught for 24 years and authored several books, including Healing Gardens: Therapeutic Benefits and Design Recommendations, co-authored with Marni Barnes in 1999, and Therapeutic Landscapes: An Evidence-Based Approach to Designing Healing Gardens and Restorative Outdoor Spaces, co-authored with Naomi Sachs, ASLA, in 2013. Though not a landscape architect, Clare’s interest is in the social aspect of design and in what the people who are using designed spaces think and feel about them. She combines this background with her passion for gardening in her own backyard.

“The following interview was conducted at Clare’s home and garden in Berkeley by Lisa Bailey, ASLA, sole proprietor of BayLeaf Studio and a consultant with Schwartz and Associates, a landscape design-build firm in Mill Valley, CA.”

Give Feedback on A Student’s Guide to Environmental Justice 
PPN: Environmental Justice
by Kari Spiegelhalter, Tess Ruswick, and Patricia Noto, ASLA Environmental Justice PPN Student Representatives

“What is environmental justice? How does it relate to social justice, environmental racism, community health, and equitable design? As designers of places and cities, what is our responsibility to work towards greater equity? As students of landscape architecture, and the student representatives of the Environmental Justice PPN, we found that these questions that weren’t always being addressed in our coursework or studio projects in school. We had a hunch that other students felt the same way, so in spring of 2017, we attended LABash at the University of Maryland, the annual gathering of landscape architecture students from all over the country. Through surveys and conversations with students, we found that many students were concerned, if a bit confused, about environmental justice.”

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