Letter from the Chair
We had a great meeting in San Diego last fall, with the opportunity to get to know several of our PPN members. During the meeting, we talked about visions and goals for the next year that focus on enhancing communications
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An Interview With Kathleen Benedict, Senior Landscape Architect, City of Fort Collins
In each newsletter, we will focus on a Parks and Recreation Professional Practice Network (PPN) member who works hard to create and shape excellent parks. Almost all park planners work at some point to help create a forward-thinking vision that might protect a city from a flood but also provide a path for commuters to enjoy a morning pedal to work.
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New Resources for Inviting Nature Back into Play
Climbing into the arms of a sweet smelling southern magnolia tree, splashing in the miniature waterfalls of a limestone lined creek, and sifting through a playground of pea gravel in search of ancient sea fossils are a few of my treasured memories of enjoying the freedom to explore the natural world that surrounded me as a child.
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Playground Sun Safety
Landscape architects and designers are constantly faced with the challenge of designing safe and attractive play areas. One particularly important aspect is the need for shade and weather protection. The importance of adding shade to playgrounds has come to the forefront as daycare owners and playground designers realize the importance of sun protection, especially for children who are particularly susceptible to the sun’s damaging effects.
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Washington Street Park, Tampa, Florida
The City of Tampa recently dedicated its newest addition to the city’s park system. Washington Street Park is located in the Channel District near Ybor Channel and is close to downtown Tampa. The half-acre park was designed with an urban, artistic, and nautical theme to blend with the urban neighborhood’s character, while still meeting its current needs.
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So What Can Lightweight Aggregates Do For You?
Park maintenance professionals and designers know of the challenges facing parks, golf courses, and sports fields. The demand for quality conditions exists but often runs counter to the reality of budget cuts, aging facilities, and increased use of the facilities. Yet, a common thread in quality park conditions start with the soil and that’s where lightweight aggregates can help. If used properly, they can help save water and reduce maintenance, add environmental benefits, and provide a stream of new revenue.
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CONTENTS


Letter from the Chair
An Interview With Kathleen Benedict, Senior Landscape Architect, City of Fort Collins
New Resources for Inviting Nature Back into Play
Playground Sun Safety
Washington Street Park, Tampa, Florida
So What Can Lightweight Aggregates Do For You?
 

 

Alison Jumper, ASLA, Chair
(479) 444-3469
alisonjumper@yahoo.com